BURN SITE

Preparation
& Process

 

© John Marshall

process-tncwashington_74523745.jpg
 


The 15 prescribed fire project sites identified by the forest collaboratives are spread across the dry, conifer forests of Eastern Washington. These projects represent years of hard work, preparation, and planning.

Jump to:  Tapash Burns   /   NCWFHC Burns  /  NEWFC Burns  / Air Quality Monitoring

While each site is unique, the projects share many common objectives:

  • reduce overstocked vegetation and fuels
  • increase opportunities for safer firefighting
  • restore and maintain habitat
  • create healthy forests that are more resilient to fire, disease, and insects

Sites go through a pre-treatment process where forests are thinned and fuels reduced to make the area safer for professionals to put fire on the ground. Boundaries around the burn project area, called ‘control lines’, are put in place. Control lines may use natural features like streams, already constructed features like roads, or may be newly created hand lines or dozer lines.

A detailed burn plan is created of the project area, including burn goals and objectives, available manpower, and required weather conditions. The burn plan details how to complete the burn itself and manage smoke, and includes multiple contingency plans for containing any fire that may go over the control lines.

On the burn, qualified and trained fire personnel work as a team with the right equipment to meet the objectives of the burn plan and safely manage the fire.

  • Trained fire professionals are continuously on site, and have ready access to backup staff, as needed.
  • Professional grade tools and heavy equipment are on site, including hose lays, engines, tenders, dozers and more.
  • Fire professionals provide continuous fuels monitoring for the most efficient burning, including self-shutdown when objectives can’t be met or smoke intrusion is predicted.
  • Fire crews continue to secure and monitor the project site after the burn is complete.

Prescribed fire is professional fire — don't try it at home.


 
 

Tapash Sustainable Forest Collaborative

Jump to:  Tapash Burns   /   NCWFHC Burns  /  NEWFC Burns  / Air Quality Monitoring

Oak Creek

Management  Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife
Acres  80 acres
Location  Oak Creek Wildlife Area, near Hwy 12 west of Naches, WA
Lead Objectives  Restoring fire-dependent dry forest and associated habitat
Info  Ross Huffman   /  509-653-2390

Angel

Management  Naches Ranger District
Acres  500 acres
Location  Near Niles, WA and west of Naches, WA
Lead Objectives  Ongoing forest restoration project designed to mimic natural fire effects and protect areas where houses and forests meet
Info  Jeff Dimke  /  509-653-1408 or Jason Emhoff  /  509-653-1492

Canteen

Management  Naches Ranger District
Acres  500 acres
Location  Near Hwy 410 outside of Nile, WA and northwest of Naches, WA
Lead Objectives  Ongoing forest restoration project designed to mimic natural fire effects and reduce leftover vegetation and fuel from recent timber sales
Info  Jeff Dimke  /  509-653-1408 or Jason Emhoff  /  509-653-1492

Liberty Fuels

Management  Cle Elum Ranger District
Acres  115 acres
Location  Near Hwy 97 outside Liberty, WA
Lead Objectives  Forest health restoration, logging slash removal, promoting wildlife forage
Info  Jason Seldal, AFMO Fuels / 509-852-1034

Orion

Management  Cle Elum Ranger District
Acres  400 acres
Location  Near Hwy 97 outside Liberty, WA
Lead Objectives  Forest health restoration, logging slash removal, promoting wildlife forage
Info  Jason Seldal, AFMO Fuels / 509-852-1034

 
 

 
 

North Central Washington Forest Health Collaborative

Jump to:  Tapash Burns   /   NCWFHC Burns  /  NEWFC Burns  / Air Quality Monitoring

Chumstick

Management  Wenatchee River Ranger District
Acres  400 acres
Location  North of Leavenworth, WA
Lead Objectives  Forest restoration and hazardous fuels reduction
Info  Michael J. Barajas, AFMO Fuels  /  509-885-5992  /  Interactive Forest Service Burn Map

Natapoc

Management  Wenatchee River Ranger District
Acres  800 acres
Location  Near Plain, WA and Lake Wenatchee
Lead Objectives  Forest restoration and hazardous fuels reduction
Info  Michael J. Barajas, AFMO Fuels  /  509-885-5992  /  Interactive Forest Service Burn Map

Twenty Five Mile

Management  Chelan Ranger District
Acres  600 acres
Location  Across Lake Chelan from Manson, WA and northwest of Chelan, WA
Lead Objectives  Forest restoration, fuels reduction where homes and forests meet, promoting aspen stands, and enhancing/maintaining Northern Spotted Owl habitat
Info  Jeff Bouschor, AFMO Fuels  /  509-682-4950  /  Decision Memo for Twenty Five Mile Project

Goat

Management  Methow Valley Ranger District
Acres  1070 acres
Location  Near Hwy 20 northwest of Winthrop, WA
Lead Objectives  Forest restoration
Info  Matt Ellis, District FMO  /  509-996-4015  /  Goat & Rendezvous Natural Fuel Underburn CE 

Eight Mile Bottom

Management  Methow Valley Ranger District
Acres  479 acres
Location  North of Winthrop, WA
Lead Objectives  Forest restoration and improving scenic and recreational aspects
Info  Matt Ellis, District FMO  /  509-996-4015  /  Eightmile Vegetation Management Plan

Upper Rendezvous

Management  Methow Valley Ranger District
Acres  936 Acres
Location  Near Hwy 20 northwest of Winthrop, WA
Lead Objectives  Forest restoration and improving scenic and recreational aspects
Info  Matt Ellis, District FMO  /  509-996-4015  /  Goat & Rendezvous Natural Fuel Underburn CE

 
 

 
 

Northeast Washington Forestry Coalition

Jump to:  Tapash Burns   /   NCWFHC Burns  /  NEWFC Burns  / Air Quality Monitoring

Little Vulcan

Management  Republic Ranger District
Acres  500 acres
Location  Outside of Curlew, WA north of Republic, WA
Lead Objectives  Forest health restoration, promote growth of browse and forage plans for wildlife, restore Lynx habitat
Info  Reed Heckly, FMO  /  509-775-7400

Paradise 90

Management  Three Rivers Ranger District
Acres  804 acres
Location  South of Hwy 20 between Republic, WA and Kettle Falls, WA
Lead Objectives  Forest health restoration, promote growth of browse and forage plants for wildlife  

Hanlon

Management  Newport Ranger District
Acres  600
Location  8 miles southeast of Ione, WA
Lead Objectives  Forest restoration, hazardous fuels reduction, stimulate growth of browse plants for big game wildlife species  

Sherman Creek

Management  Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife
Acres  538 acres
Location  Sherman Creek Wildlife Area near Lake Roosevelt and west of Kettle Falls, WA
Lead Objectives  Restoring fire-dependent dry forest and associated habitat
Info  Daro Palmer  /  509-738-4120


 
 

Air Quality Monitoring

A major challenge when using controlled burning is to simultaneously protect air quality from the inevitable smoke that is produced. To the greatest extent possible, burning is planned for days when winds and weather will keep smoke away from populated areas.

One goal of the Pilot is to monitor and evaluate the impacts of prescribed burning on air quality. Most of the proposed Pilot burns are in fairly remote parts of Washington, and some small, local communities are not well represented by the extensive permanent air quality monitoring network operated by the Washington Department of Ecology. To determine the effect of burning on air quality in these more remote parts of the state, nine new temporary air quality monitors have been deployed to supplement the permanent monitoring network already in operation. New monitors have been placed in Curlew, Kettle Falls, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Usk, Manson, Plain, Liberty, Naches, and Nile. In addition, permanent monitors in Winthrop, Chelan, and Leavenworth will be scrutinized for smoke impacts from controlled burning. Learn more about smoke and air quality in Washington at wasmoke.blogspot.com.